Spring into science!

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Spring is a great time to get out into the fresh air. It’s also a super opportunity to discover the seasonal changes in your local wildlife.

Astronomers say spring starts on 20th March. Yet, due to warmer winters, it seems to get earlier every year for plants and animals, and no-one knows exactly what the consequences will be.

Time for Citizen Science

Citizen Science is a way for people in your community to learn more about local green spaces and share their knowledge with the wider world (while getting active, meeting other volunteers, and inspiring little ones!).

Pick something that sparks local interest and get counting. Often all you need to take part is a simple spotter’s guide, notebook and pencil.

Here’s some ideas to get you started:

Migratory birds

Everyone gets excited about the first cuckoo of spring. But what about the first arctic skua – recorded from 11th April in Hampshire?

Breaking bud

Which trees are coming into leaf and when? How are diseases such as Ash dieback affecting your area?

Pond life

Look out for frog spawn, tadpoles and newts. Amphibians world –wide are under serious stress. The more we know, the more chance there is to save them

Night-wings

Late spring is a good time to count the bat species in your area. This does require specialist detectors, so talk to your local bat group for advice and the equipment you’ll need

Minibeasts

As the weather improves, invertebrates are on the move. You might find something unexpected in your patch. Look out especially for 7-spot ladybirds, butterflies, bumble bee and wasp queens

For guidance on how to set up a project visit TCV’s Citizen Science web page or contact your local TCV office.

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